Literary arts – Litary http://litary.net/ Tue, 09 Nov 2021 21:32:43 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8.1 https://litary.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/cropped-icon-1-32x32.png Literary arts – Litary http://litary.net/ 32 32 Literary arts at Featherstone and Slough Farm team up for writing residency https://litary.net/literary-arts-at-featherstone-and-slough-farm-team-up-for-writing-residency/ https://litary.net/literary-arts-at-featherstone-and-slough-farm-team-up-for-writing-residency/#respond Mon, 08 Nov 2021 18:04:37 +0000 https://litary.net/literary-arts-at-featherstone-and-slough-farm-team-up-for-writing-residency/

Literary Arts at Featherstone (formerly Noepe Center for the Arts) and Slough Farm announce their partnership to create an invitational and nominated writing residency for historically underrepresented writers of Martha’s Vineyard.

According to a press release from Literary Arts, as of October 21, Brooklyn writers and poets Shira Erlichman and Angel Nafis, as well as island writer Esper Gaspardi, are living at the Slough Farm residence where they will be working on de new and ongoing writing projects through November 7. As part of this residency, the three writers will receive housing, a stipend, and a 1.5-hour writing workshop for a group of Charter and MVRHS students taking place at the Featherstone Center for the Arts.

Shira Erlichman is an author, visual artist and musician. She recently released her first poetry book “Odes to Lithium” and a children’s book “Be / Hold”. She has received scholarships from the Vermont Studio Center, Millay Residency and AIR Serenbe. His work has been featured in The Rumpus, PBS NewsHour’s Poetry Series, The Huffington Post, The Seattle Times, and The New York Times, among others.

Angel Nafis is the author of “BlackGirl Mansion” (Red Beard Press / New School Poetics, 2012). She received her BA from Hunter College and her MA in Poetry from Warren Wilson College. His work has been published in “The BreakBeat Poets Anthology”, The Rumpus, Poetry Magazine, Buzzfeed Reader and elsewhere. Nafis is a member of Cave Canem, recipient of a Millay Colony residency, Urban Word NYC mentor, and founder and curator of the Greenlight Bookstore Poetry Salon. In 2011, she represented New York at the Women of the World Poetry Slam and at the National Poetry Slam. She is half of the ODES FOR YOU tour with poet, musician and visual artist Shira Erlichman and with poet Morgan parker, she runs The other collective of black girls, a Black Feminist poetry duo on international tour. Facilitating writing workshops and reading poems around the world, she lives in Brooklyn. In 2016, Nafis received the Ruth Lilly and Dorothy Sargent Rosenberg Poetry Fellowship from the Poetry Foundation, and in 2017, she received a Creative Writing Fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts.

Esper Gaspardi attended the Institute of American Indian Arts and Sterling College of Vermont, where they earned a degree in Sustainable Food Systems. At a young age, Esper began writing his own short stories and fairy tales to read after running out of books in the children’s section of the library, but their interest in writing fiction increased after taking the programs. from The Telling Room High School (of Maine). When they started their graduation thesis, they became passionate about writing non-fiction. For nearly two years, they interviewed Indigenous communities to document the preservation of Indigenous farming techniques and creation stories that are closely tied to the Indigenous cultures of North and Central America.

Originally, when the Noepe Center for Literary Arts was based at the Point Way Inn in Edgartown, there was a strong residency program. Pursuing this residency program has been a long-term goal of the literary arts at Featherstone, the statement said.

For more information on literary arts programs at the Featherstone Center for the Arts, call Mathea Morais at 508-564-2789, or email literary arts@featherstone.org.

]]> https://litary.net/literary-arts-at-featherstone-and-slough-farm-team-up-for-writing-residency/feed/ 0 Scotiabank announces increased support for Canadian literary arts through Little Free Library and Scotiabank Giller Prize collaboration https://litary.net/scotiabank-announces-increased-support-for-canadian-literary-arts-through-little-free-library-and-scotiabank-giller-prize-collaboration/ https://litary.net/scotiabank-announces-increased-support-for-canadian-literary-arts-through-little-free-library-and-scotiabank-giller-prize-collaboration/#respond Tue, 02 Nov 2021 14:03:19 +0000 https://litary.net/scotiabank-announces-increased-support-for-canadian-literary-arts-through-little-free-library-and-scotiabank-giller-prize-collaboration/

TORONTO –News Direct– Scotiabank

TORONTO, November 2, 2021 / 3BL Media / – Scotiabank announced a new collaboration with Little Free Library, the world’s largest book-sharing movement, to place thousands of copies of the novels shortlisted for the Scotiabank Prize Giller in Little Free Libraries across Canada.

Today, Canadians can now find “book sets” containing the 5 shortlisted novels in hundreds of small free libraries across the country. The collaboration is an important part of Scotiabank’s support for the Canadian literary arts and will allow more Canadians to access the novels shortlisted for the award and promote the work of some of Canada’s most talented and diverse authors. .

“Our mission for Little Free Library is to be a catalyst to build community, inspire readers and expand access to books for all,” said Greig Metzger, executive director of Little Free Library. “We are proud of our collaboration with Scotiabank to bring the shortlisted novels for the Scotiabank Giller Prize to more readers. Placing brand new, free novels in our nationwide book boxes is the perfect way to connect Canadians with some of the country’s top storytellers.

Little Free Library is a non-profit organization that strives to expand access to books to readers of all skill levels and interests. With more than 100,000 small free libraries around the world, the initiative shares 42 million books with readers in the community each year.

“Scotiabank, fundamentally, is committed to making a difference in the communities in which we operate and one of the ways to do that is through our partnership with the Scotiabank Giller Prize,” said John Doig, Executive Vice-President, Retail Sales, Scotiabank. . “By providing more opportunities for Canadians to access the novels shortlisted for the award, we hope this initiative will create the largest book club in Canada and that readers of all ages from coast to coast to coast, will find solace, solace, adventure, action and learning this year. talent list. “

Canadians can view the shortlisted novels by visiting one of Canada’s small free libraries in their neighborhood. Scotiabank is also making room for Canadian stories on billboards and billboards across the country with Storytellers Shelves – where Canadians can scan a QR code and access an extensive preview of all of the novels in the Scotiabank Giller Award 2021.

Between the Pages: An evening with the Scotiabank Giller Award finalists will take place on November 4, 2021 at Koerner Hall. Hosted by Jael Richardson, it will be an hour of readings, questions and answers, and immerse you in the minds and creative lives of the 2021 shortlist writers. It will be streamed live on the Prize’s website and on the Facebook and YouTube pages. For more information, please visit: www.scotiabankgillerprize.ca/news-events/events-and-important-dates.

Readers are encouraged to watch the 2021 Scotiabank Giller Prize broadcast on Monday, November 8 at 9 p.m. ET (10 a.m.AT / 10:30 a.m. NT) on CBC and the free streaming service CBC Gem, where the winner will be announced. A live broadcast will begin at 9 p.m. ET on CBC Books, and a special will air on CBC Radio One and the free CBC Listen app at 9 p.m. ET (10 a.m. AT / 10:30 a.m. NT).

About ScotiabankScotiabank is a leading bank in the Americas. Guided by our goal of “for every future”, we help our clients, their families and their communities succeed through a wide range of advice, products and services, including personal and commercial banking, wealth management and private banking, investment and investment banking, and capital markets. With a team of over 90,000 employees and assets of approximately $ 1.2 trillion (as of July 31, 2021), Scotiabank is listed on the Toronto Stock Exchange (TSX: BNS) and the New York Stock Exchange. (NYSE: BNS). For more information, please visit http://www.scotiabank.com and follow us on Twitter @ScotiabankViews.

About the Scotiabank Giller Prize:The Giller Prize, founded by Jack Rabinovitch in 1994, highlights the best of Canadian fiction year after year. In 2005, the prize teamed up with Scotiabank, which quadrupled the winnings. The Scotiabank Giller Prize now gives $ 100,000 per year to the author of the best novel, graphic novel or short story published in English in Canada, and $ 10,000 to each of the finalists. More information on the novels and shortlisted authors for the Giller Prize is available at: www.scotiabankgillerprize.ca/live.

About Little Free Library:Little Free Library is a non-profit organization that operates over 100,000 libraries in over 100 countries around the world. Its mission is to be a catalyst to build community, inspire readers and expand access to books for all through a global network of volunteer-run book-sharing boxes. The small free libraries are open seven days a week, 24 hours a day and are freely accessible to all, removing barriers to accessing books.

See additional media and more ESG stories from Scotiabank at 3blmedia.com

See the source version on newsdirect.com: https://newsdirect.com/news/scotiabank-announces-further-support-for-canadian-literary-arts-with-little-free-library-and-scotiabank-giller-prize – collaboration-267663082

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Support the literary arts community at the introvert ball https://litary.net/support-the-literary-arts-community-at-the-introvert-ball/ https://litary.net/support-the-literary-arts-community-at-the-introvert-ball/#respond Fri, 29 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://litary.net/support-the-literary-arts-community-at-the-introvert-ball/
Attend the What Cheer Writers Club event in person to connect with other creatives or support yourself from the comfort of your home.

Join the What Cheer Writers Club and participate in fun community festivities like on-demand poetry and silent auction. Photo courtesy of Jodie Noel Vinson.

On Saturday October 30 from 12 p.m. to 5 p.m., attend A ball of introverts and support programming and resources for writers, illustrators and podcasters throughout Rhode Island. Choose your level of engagement comfort with the ticket you choose, whether it’s the No-Show, Scribbler’s Surprise, Writer’s Care Package or Introvert’s Indulgence.

Outside the What Cheer Writers Club office, collect your designated gifts (BYO tote bag!)

No-show the ticket / donation is for those with low social battery and can stay home to show support.

The doodler’s surprise ($ 10) gives guests the chance to visit the What Cheers Writers Club in person and stay as long as they want after picking up their bag of goodies.

The Writer’s Care Pack ($ 45) comes with a number of freebies, including a journal, candle, or book; a personalized pencil from DWRI typography; a coffee bean tasting and a virtual coffee tasting with New harvest coffee October 31 at 11 a.m. and a free day of coworking at the What Cheer Writers Club.

The introvert’s indulgence ($ 75) is the ultimate self-care package, filled with a bottle of wine; a good drink at Riffraff bookstore and bar; a newspaper, candle or book; a coffee bean tasting and a virtual coffee tasting with New harvest coffee also on October 31; a personalized pencil from DWRI typography; and a free day of coworking at the What Cheer Writers Club.

160 Westminster Street, Providence, 401-307-2450, whatcheerclub.org

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Pittsburgh author Brian Broome wins prestigious Kirkus Award | Literary arts | Pittsburgh https://litary.net/pittsburgh-author-brian-broome-wins-prestigious-kirkus-award-literary-arts-pittsburgh/ https://litary.net/pittsburgh-author-brian-broome-wins-prestigious-kirkus-award-literary-arts-pittsburgh/#respond Thu, 28 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://litary.net/pittsburgh-author-brian-broome-wins-prestigious-kirkus-award-literary-arts-pittsburgh/

Click to enlarge

CP photo: Jared Wickerham

Brian broome

Pittsburgh author Brian Broome was announced as the 2021 Kirkus Prize winner in non-fiction for his memoir Hit me to the gods. The award, announced in a virtual ceremony on Thursday, October 28, is one of the most prestigious literary awards in the world and is accompanied by a prize of $ 50,000.

Ohhhhhh shit, “Broome said when the camera first turned to him during the virtual ceremony.” Odamn it. Are you kidding me? Uh, wow. I do not know what to say. I’m sitting here on my own because I thought there was no way this was happening to me. “

Hit me to the gods was nominated for the award for non-fiction alongside Kristen Radtke’s Seek You: a journey through American solitude, Tiya Miles’ All She Wore: Ashley’s Sack Journey, a memory of the black family, that of Dara Horn People worship dead Jews: Reports of a haunted present, Katherine E. Standefer’s Lightning Flowers: My Journey to Discovering the Cost of Saving a Life, and that of Juan Villoro Horizontal vertigo: a city called Mexico, translated by Alfred MacAdam.

Click to enlarge A screenshot of Brian Broome after his name was announced as the winner at the Kirkus Reviews live broadcast ceremony

A screenshot of Brian Broome after his name was announced as the winner at the Kirkus Reviews live broadcast ceremony


Broome thanked his fellow candidates in his acceptance speech. “It was an honor that my name was mentioned in the same sentences as you over the past two weeks,” he said. He also thanked others, including his mother who he waved to on camera. “Mom, I know you’re watching.”

An introduction to Broome’s book during the ceremony said tThe judges were “dazzled by the book’s unique structure, framed by Gwendolyn Brooks’ poem ‘We Real Cool’ and its self-tearing, but ultimately hopeful, insight.”
Hit me to the gods, which chronicles Broome’s journey as a black gay man and his struggles with race, sexuality, addiction and recovery, has been on several “best of” lists since its release in May 2021, including Entertainment Weekly, Apple Books , Amazon Books and Publisher’s Weekly.

It’s so gratifying for someone like me to be in this position, ”said Broome, accepting the award.

Pittsburgh writer Sharon Flake was also a finalist for a 2021 Kirkus Prize for Literature for Young Readers for her book The life I’m in. Christina Soonornvat won this category for her book All Thirteen: The Amazing Cave Rescue of the Thai Boys Soccer Team.

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Scotiabank announces additional support for Canadian literary arts in collaboration with Little Free Library and the Scotiabank Giller Prize https://litary.net/scotiabank-announces-additional-support-for-canadian-literary-arts-in-collaboration-with-little-free-library-and-the-scotiabank-giller-prize/ https://litary.net/scotiabank-announces-additional-support-for-canadian-literary-arts-in-collaboration-with-little-free-library-and-the-scotiabank-giller-prize/#respond Mon, 25 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://litary.net/scotiabank-announces-additional-support-for-canadian-literary-arts-in-collaboration-with-little-free-library-and-the-scotiabank-giller-prize/

TORONTO, 25 October 2021 / CNW / – Scotiabank today announced a new collaboration with Small free library, the world’s largest book-sharing movement, to place thousands of copies of the novels shortlisted for the Scotiabank Giller Prize in small free libraries across Canada.

Scotiabank is giving Little Free Library stewards across Canada copies of novels shortlisted for this year’s Scotiabank Giller Prize (CNW Group / Scotiabank)

Today, Canadians can now find “book sets” containing the 5 shortlisted novels in hundreds of small free libraries across the country. The collaboration is an important part of Scotiabank’s support for the Canadian literary arts and will allow more Canadians to access the novels shortlisted for the Prize and promote the work of some of the from Canada the most talented and diverse authors.

“Our mission for Little Free Library is to be a catalyst to build community, inspire readers and expand access to books for all,” said Greig Metzger, Executive Director, Little Free Library. “We are proud of our collaboration with Scotiabank to bring the shortlisted novels for the Scotiabank Giller Prize to more readers. Placing brand new, free novels in our nationwide book boxes is the perfect way to connect Canadians with some of the country’s top storytellers.

Little Free Library is a non-profit organization that strives to expand access to books to readers of all skill levels and interests. With more than 100,000 small free libraries around the world, the initiative shares 42 million books with readers in the community each year.

“Scotiabank, fundamentally, is committed to making a difference in the communities in which we operate and one of the ways we do that is through our partnership with the Scotiabank Giller Prize,” said Jean Doig, Executive Vice-President, Retail Sales, Scotiabank. “By providing more opportunities for Canadians to access the novels shortlisted for the Prize, we hope this initiative will create from Canada largest book club, and one that readers of all ages from coast to coast to coast will find solace, solace, adventure, action and learning with this year’s talent roster. “

Canadians can view the shortlisted novels by visiting one of the from Canada Small free libraries in their neighborhoods. Scotiabank is also making room for Canadian stories on billboards and billboards across the country with Storytellers Shelves – where Canadians can scan a QR code and access an extensive preview of all of the novels in the Scotiabank Giller Award 2021.

Between the Pages: An evening with the Scotiabank Giller Award finalists will take place on November 4, 2021 at Koerner Hall. Hosted by Jael Richardson, it will be an hour of readings, questions and answers, and immerse you in the minds and creative lives of the writers of the 2021 shortlist. It will be broadcast live on the Prize website and Facebook and Youtube pages. For more information, please visit: www.scotiabankgillerprize.ca/news-events/events-and-important-dates.

Readers are encouraged to watch the 2021 Scotiabank Giller Prize broadcast on Monday, November 8 at 9 p.m. ET (10 a.m. AT / 10:30 a.m. NT) on CBC and the free program. CBC Gem streaming service, where the winner will be announced. A live broadcast will begin at 9 p.m. ET on Radio-Canada books, and a special will air on CBC Radio One and the free program CBC listening app at 9 p.m. ET (10 a.m. AT / 10:30 a.m. NT).

About Scotiabank
Scotiabank is a leading bank in the Americas. Guided by our goal of “for every future”, we help our clients, their families and their communities succeed through a wide range of advice, products and services, including personal and commercial banking, wealth management and private banking, investment and investment banking, and capital markets. With a team of over 90,000 employees and assets of approximately $ 1.2 trillion (as of July 31, 2021), Scotiabank is listed on the Toronto Stock Exchange (TSX: BNS) and the New York Stock Exchange. (NYSE: BNS). For more information, please visit http://www.banquescotia.com and follow us on Twitter @ScotiabankViews.

About the Scotiabank Giller Prize:
The Giller Prize, founded by Jack Rabinovitch in 1994, highlights the best of Canadian fiction year after year. In 2005, the prize teamed up with Scotiabank, which quadrupled the winnings. The Scotiabank Giller Prize now awards $ 100,000 annually to the author of the best Canadian novel, graphic novel or short story published in English, and $ 10,000 to each of the finalists. More information on the novels and shortlisted authors for the Giller Prize is available at: www.scotiabankgillerprize.ca/live.

About Little Free Library:
Small free library is a non-profit organization that operates over 100,000 libraries in over 100 countries around the world. Its mission is to be a catalyst to build community, inspire readers and expand access to books for all through a global network of volunteer-run book-sharing boxes. The small free libraries are open seven days a week, 24 hours a day and are freely accessible to all, removing barriers to accessing books.

Scotiabank Logo (CNW Group / Scotiabank)

Scotiabank Logo (CNW Group / Scotiabank)

SOURCE Scotiabank

Cision

Cision

View original content to download multimedia: http://www.newswire.ca/en/releases/archive/October2021/25/c5354.html

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Corinna Vallianatos Brings ‘Origin Stories’ to Literary Arts Live – Student Bates https://litary.net/corinna-vallianatos-brings-origin-stories-to-literary-arts-live-student-bates/ https://litary.net/corinna-vallianatos-brings-origin-stories-to-literary-arts-live-student-bates/#respond Wed, 13 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://litary.net/corinna-vallianatos-brings-origin-stories-to-literary-arts-live-student-bates/

On Wednesday October 6, the English Department hosted its next edition of Literary Arts Live, a monthly series featuring writers reading and discussing their work. This month’s session was moderated by English speaker Jessica Anthony and featured fiction writer Corinna Vallianatos via the Zoom webinar.

Vallianatos’ short story collection, titled “My Escapee,” won the 2011 Grace Paley Award for Short Fiction. Her first full length novel, “The Foreland” was released in October 2020. Her stories have been published widely, including in “McSweeney’s”, “The Kenyon Review” and more. She is a professor of creative writing at Claremont McKenna College in California.

Vallianatos is currently working on a new collection called “Origin Stories” and for her reading she shared an upcoming story from the series: “Fainting Studies”. She described it as a story about “female friendship, the desire to make art and a rude dog” before embarking on the tale.

Told in the first person, “Fainting Studies” centers on two friends – the narrator and the narrator’s friend, who is working on his second film – settling in their forties. They haven’t spoken for a while. The story opens with an informal take on the friend’s second film, but what it is about is retained until about the middle of the text.

Eventually, readers learn that the film is a dramatization of the event that initially kept the two friends from speaking. The narrator, as you might expect, is unsure of what to do about it.

Corinna Vallianatos read “Fainting Studies”, a story centered on female friendship and art, from her upcoming collection. (Bates English Department)

What happened in between, you ask? Well, the recently divorced friend has gone to a hot spring. The narrator hounds his poodle. At the dog park, the poodle bites a small dog’s neck enough to make it bleed. The friend rushes home and gets angry, and the two don’t speak until the narrator is invited to watch the movie.

After the reading, Vallianatos discussed what Anthony described as “the genesis and germination of history”. Vallianatos said she wanted to “write about shame and creativity and how these two types of impulses go hand in hand”. The filmmaker of the story is inspired a bit by a real filmmaker that Vallianatos knows.

In turn, Vallianatos based the narrator, a writer, a bit on herself. She explained this “[she] was not going to give [herself] the disguise when [she] did not give it to the other character in the story.

In the world of writing, there is a sort of taboo about writing about writers. Vallianatos said she had previously rejected stories because they had writers. “It has always struck me as a little strange, because what world do writers know better than the one we’re sort of stuck in? ” she asked.

Vallianatos started her career in poetry, so she is very drawn to detail at the sentence level rather than large overarching structural changes. She felt herself lean on some of her “poetic inclinations” as she worked on her new collection.

Her writing process begins with an interesting side of the character. She doesn’t like asking “what if” questions about her work because she finds them too intriguing. Instead, she likes to ask questions like, “How can this phrase sing?” How can this character be more unexpected? How can I get to the truth in a more roundabout way? “

Vallianatos doesn’t like to describe either, because then “the composition would be scary”. The “not knowing” is his favorite part.

There is no publication date yet for “Origin Stories”, but you can find “My Escapee” in your favorite bookstore or through the library’s CBBCat. The next Literary Arts Live will be held virtually on Wednesday November 3 and will feature poet Ada Limón.

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Word literary arts festival returns via Zoom | Castine Patriote https://litary.net/word-literary-arts-festival-returns-via-zoom-castine-patriote/ https://litary.net/word-literary-arts-festival-returns-via-zoom-castine-patriote/#respond Fri, 08 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://litary.net/word-literary-arts-festival-returns-via-zoom-castine-patriote/

Like Maine COVID The wave continues, organizers of Word have decided that the annual literary arts festival will revert to the online format introduced last year, according to a press release. The festival’s free events and paid workshops will be available through Zoom, October 21-24, with pre-registration required. For event details and registration links, visit wordfestival.org.

Guest speakers will include novelist Susan Choi, journalist Bob Keyes and four notable poets, as well as some of the region’s most popular food writers. Word will also feature local school tours by children’s author and illustrator Russ Cox and children’s and young adult author Anica Mrose Rissi, funded by Bar Harbor Bank. & Confidence.

Opening night on October 21 kicks off with a documentary commissioned from Blue Hill filmmaker Matt Shaw that features “Close Apart,” a series that links the poetry of Brooksville’s Beatrix Gates to the etchings of intaglio printmaker Tim Seabrook and painter Leslie Cummins of Blue Hill. The film will start at 6 p.m. followed by a brief chat with the artists.

At 7 p.m., the festival will feature Portland journalist Bob Keyes, author of The Isolation Artist: Scandal, Deception, and the Last Days of Robert Indiana, in conversation with Paul Sacaridiz, executive director of Haystack Mountain School of Crafts in Deer Isle. .

Susan Choi, author of the National Book Award-winning novel Trust Exercise, will chat Friday evening, October 22, at 7 p.m., with Laura Miller, book and culture columnist for Slate and a member of the Word committee. Choi is the author of five adult novels and a children’s book.

On Saturday, October 23, author and illustrator Russ Cox will present at 10 am a children’s program called “Drawing on Your Imagination” (The boy whose face freezes like that by Lynn Plourde and Rio and Silas in love with Michele Kean).

The Saturday night program will feature readings and discussions by four poets, including former Maine Poet Laureate Stuart Kestenbaum of Deer Isle; Arisa White, who teaches English and Creative Writing at Colby College and is the author of the poetic memoir Who’s Your Daddy and co-editor of the anthology Home is Where You Queer Your Heart; Maya Williams, the Portland Poet Laureate, a survivor of queer Black Mixed Race religious suicide, most recently a finalist in the Maine Writers and Publishers Alliance Chapbook Competition; and Tim Seibles, former Virginia Poet Laureate and professor at Old Dominion University, and author of five books of poetry. Seibles will also offer a poetry workshop, “Personas Are Us: Who Do You Think You Talking To?

Other workshops include “Where to start… and how to continue”, with Anica Mrose Rissi; “Flash and Micro-Fiction: The Art of Brevity”, with Lori Thatcher, and a memory workshop with Elizabeth Garber.

Alicia Anstead, arts and culture journalist and editor-in-chief of national magazine Inside Arts, will host the Word editorial panel. Featured panelists include Brooke Dojny of Sedgwick, most recently author of Chowderland; Barbara Damrosch, gardening writer and author of the Four Seasons Farm Gardener’s Cookbook and novelist and memorialist Deborah Joy Corey, founder of the Castine-based Blue Angel food program. wordfestival.org or call 374-5632.

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“Intersecting Expressions” – an experiment in the musical, visual and literary arts – WSU Insider https://litary.net/intersecting-expressions-an-experiment-in-the-musical-visual-and-literary-arts-wsu-insider/ https://litary.net/intersecting-expressions-an-experiment-in-the-musical-visual-and-literary-arts-wsu-insider/#respond Tue, 28 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://litary.net/intersecting-expressions-an-experiment-in-the-musical-visual-and-literary-arts-wsu-insider/

Don’t miss this unique experimental performance of music, film and poetry, starring Christiano Rodrigues, Karen Nguyen and Darryl Singleton from the School of Music and Professors Squeak Meisel and Io Palmer from the Department of Fine Arts, on Tuesday 7 September. 28, 7:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. at Bryan Hall Theater and live on YouTube.

Each of the artists will present their auditory, visual and poetic impressions of the musical works of Bach and Brahms and the lesser-known composers Reynaldo Hahn, Amy Beach and Florence Price.

Music, being an art form devoid of images or words, is often abstract to the listener and no one experiences it the same way, said Rodrigues, who conceived the project. Since we all hear sounds and identify with them differently, this event seeks to answer the question: How do different artists express music through their own art?

“When the lights go out, audiences will witness live music, film and poetry – all expressing the same musical program in three distinct ways,” Rodrigues said. “We hope this experience will provide our audience with an immersive and multidimensional artistic experience. “

A recording of the event will be available for viewing on YouTube only until Wednesday, September 29 at noon.

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Memory workshop as part of the Writing the Watershed literary arts festival https://litary.net/memory-workshop-as-part-of-the-writing-the-watershed-literary-arts-festival/ https://litary.net/memory-workshop-as-part-of-the-writing-the-watershed-literary-arts-festival/#respond Wed, 15 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://litary.net/memory-workshop-as-part-of-the-writing-the-watershed-literary-arts-festival/

The place is just as important as the characters in a given story; this is how the poet Judith Perst sees it.

“We’re shaped by the places we live in and I think we carry all the places we’ve never been. In a novel or a movie or something like that, I think the place is just as strong a character as any person, ”said Perst, who runs Spirit Wind Studio in Duanesburg.

As part of Writing the Watershed, a literary art festival hosted by the Schoharie River Center in Esperance on Saturday, Perst will be giving a memory workshop focusing on the power of place.

Early in her career, Perst trained as a clinical social worker and worked for BOCES as well as the New Choices Recovery Center. She later studied expressive arts and creativity coaching.

“There was a 20-year period where I really left my creative self in the dust. I was busy and stressed and didn’t do anything with it. Then at mid-life, when [I] was in my mid 40s, it hit me like a freight train and I started writing again, ”said Perst.

Over the years, she has written several books of poetry, including the most recent “Geography of Loss,” which was published by Finishing Line Press earlier this year and traces her family history and lessons learned from loss.

“I just think the connection between creativity and healing is deep. I have seen this happen in the area of ​​drug addiction. I have seen this happen with myself, healing from bad experiences, ”said Perst.

She has taught many workshops over the years and one of the most common challenges people face is the fear of being judged.

“I am not an English teacher. I’m not going to come up with a red pencil and mark your work. . . The first thing is to get it out of your head and your heart and onto the page. If you’re scared you can’t do that, ”said Perst.

During the workshop at the Schoharie River Center, she will give participants writing instructions, including poetry and short prose, then ask them to write for a few minutes at a time. The goal is not to come away with a finished piece but to start something.

“Don’t worry if it’s not over, you can work on it later, just pull out something that starts your journey with this coin. Get a first draft there. . . it’s my goal with people is to have them explore for their own experience what the place means to them. In particular, what life in the Schoharie Valley means to them, ”said Perst.

The Power of Place workshop runs from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. on Saturdays at the David Remling Science Laboratory. Tickets cost $ 20 and pre-registration is required.

Beyond the writing workshop, Writing the Watershed will also include a conversation and concert with Sara Milonovich and Reggie Harris from 7 to 8:15 p.m. They will discuss ways in which this place can be an inspiration to writing songs. Milanovich is a local violinist and teacher, and Harris is a local singer-songwriter known for interpreting the global musical narrative.

Tickets cost $ 10 for individuals and $ 20 for families.

Other highlights of the festival include:

  • The Cultural Hall (2047 Burtonville Road) will present Videos of Place, a mini film festival featuring works focused on the place. It will take place from noon to 1 p.m.
  • A panel discussion with former Gazette columnist Sara Foss and geologist John Garver. Entitled “Science, History and Justice: Writing in the Field”, the discussion is expected to take place from 1 pm to 2 pm.
  • From 2 p.m. to 3 p.m., there will be a panel discussion with Eric Ayotte from the Schoharie River Center, Hannah Degarmo (media producer and filmmaker) and Todd DeGarmo (director, Center for Folklife and History, Crandall Public Library) on tell stories through the humanities and digital media environment.
  • At 3:00 pm, there will be a presentation by the curator for the exhibition: “After the Storms: 10 Years and Over 36,000 Volunteers Later” with Ellen McHale, New York Folklore and Lillian Spina-Caza, media producer.

For tickets and more information, visit schoharierivercenter.org.

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Julien Baker explored the literary arts on ‘Little Oblivions’, now she’s ready to educate https://litary.net/julien-baker-explored-the-literary-arts-on-little-oblivions-now-shes-ready-to-educate/ https://litary.net/julien-baker-explored-the-literary-arts-on-little-oblivions-now-shes-ready-to-educate/#respond Tue, 14 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://litary.net/julien-baker-explored-the-literary-arts-on-little-oblivions-now-shes-ready-to-educate/

Baker’s “Little Oblivions,” her third studio album, received widespread praise for its full band sound (new accompaniments that she performed on her own) and intentional, confident lyricism. The 12 track album is more streamlined than equally emotionally anchored “Sprained Ankle” and “Turn Out the Light”. Baker worked with producer and sound engineer Calvin Lauber, who will tour with her this fall (Matthew Gilliam, who played in Baker’s high school band, The Star Killers, will also be joining) to record the album at Young Avenue. Sound in Memphis.

Baker also returned to Middle Tennessee State University, where she graduated in English, while recording “Little Oblivions” on weekends and school vacations. “I was really gratified to see how different it was from my musical life,” she said. “I didn’t have to play the character of the artist I had started to fall apart with. It was a gift, honestly – you don’t play anymore, you don’t disappear. You just become who you are.

The reintroduction to education influenced Baker’s songwriting, she explained, teaching him to be “a more attentive listener.” “I see myself doing it with records, listening to them over and over again to see if I can find something new. Like the way scholars read the same book over and over again, ”she said. “It makes me more deliberate in the way I write. It doesn’t all have to be so pure.

And as a scholar, she quoted William Wordsworth: “Poetry is the spontaneous overflow of powerful feelings; it takes its origin from the emotion gathered in the tranquility. “Everyone is focusing on the ‘spontaneous overflow’ part,” she said, “and forget about the [recollected] part. But you have to have this to keep things clear, concise, and informed. “

His approach to songwriting on “Little Oblivions” is rich and steamy indie rock that rises and swells. Baker’s musical style is thematically the “main character”, her literary chops shine as she always keeps her listener close and engaged, providing the lyrical intimacy and seriousness that initially made her a favorite of teenagers and their parents. . “The smoke alarm has been going on for weeks / No one has shown up / And half the time it’s not what you think,” she sings on the first single, “Faith Healer », A questioning of faith in all its facets.

The tour – which stops in Boston this Friday at the House of Blues – is Baker’s first since the pandemic led US sites to close for 2020 until this year. When she spoke, she was getting ready for Tennessee’s Bonnaroo Music and Arts Festival – the lineup also included her boygenius associate Phoebe Bridgers. “It looks like a swarm of people,” Baker said. “But there’s a tug in me that says, ‘Wouldn’t it be so great to play shows again?’ ”Although she didn’t need to worry; the festival was canceled a few days after our call.

Still, Baker is delighted to be back on the road. She cited boygenius third member Lucy Dacus, who did a brief run in the United States with Bright Eyes this summer. “None of them got sick, none of their crew got sick,” she said. “I was delighted to hear this news. And while they may have been apprehensive, I haven’t done anything like that yet. “

On her shows, Baker will sell a $ 10 zine featuring a series of sketches she made during the pandemic. Profits will be donated to OUTMemphis, an LGBTQ + welcome center in Memphis. That said, she hopes to publish a body of work for young adults in the future, citing Tegan and Sara’s 2019 memoir, “High School,” as inspiration.

“I just read so many musician bios that are like a summary of all the messed up stuff that happened to them and their rock star stories,” Baker said. “Corn [Tegan and Sara] just wrote about their childhood as homosexual women speaking to young homosexuals. It was such a sweet and deliberate choice to do this. And I think it might be a way to reparent my inner child.

September 17. $ 25- $ 35. House of the Blues. 888-693-2583, www.houseofblues.com/boston

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